Free Eulogy Templates and Tips for the Perfect Send Off

Our printable free eulogy templates will help you to create the perfect funeral speech. Scroll down for the printouts.  

You’re asked to speak at a funeral and you have a short period of time to gather your thoughts and prepare your speech. Experiencing nervousness is completely normal, especially while you’re coping with grief and sorrow from the loss. It may feel like an overwhelming task. Which of the many details of their life do you include? How long should it be? What should you say?

Writing a eulogy doesn’t have to be scary. Even if you aren’t a writer or public speaker, using the guidelines below, you will be able to write and deliver a meaningful and heartfelt speech.  


Preparing to Write a Eulogy - Brainstorming

Begin by thinking of things you would be comfortable sharing about this person. The blank page is less intimidating if you start jotting down notes in each of the outline categories below. You won’t use every fact or memory, but will choose key pieces to include in the template. (Scroll down for ideas if the loss is of a child). 


Eulogy speech outline

- Opening

  • Thank everyone for coming.
  • What was your relationship with the person? 
  • What are some key topics you’d like to share about them? 

- Early life 

  • Was he/she born elsewhere or somewhere special? 
  • Is there anything interesting about their childhood and how it affected their life?  
  • Education and work, marriage and children
  • Did he/she have a mentionable education or career? 
  • Jot down names of the family.

- Significant events and achievements, hobbies and service, beliefs and passions

  • What stands out about them in these categories? 
  • Significant events can be anything specific to them or their family, whether positive or negative. What are some events that made an impact on their life? 
  • Achievements can be more than an award. Think of things that were important to them. Maybe he/she considered their children to be their biggest achievement. 
  • Take a moment to think about what meant a lot to them, what did they value? 

- Memories

  • Write down several memories that come to mind when you think of this person. 

- Closing

  • To make a resonating speech bring it full circle at the end. That means, try refer back to something in the closing that you mentioned in the opening.  
  • Lastly, thank everyone for coming to celebrate their life. 

“Carve your name on hearts, not tombstones. A legacy is etched into the minds of others and the stories they share about you.” 

Shannon L. Alder


If the eulogy is for a child, some of the above sections may not be appropriate. Avoid anger and despair over the loss of a young life. Instead, focus on positive memories and stories that honour their memory. Consider the following points in your brainstorming:

  • Write your thoughts on how the death of a child affects those around them.
  • What made the child special to you? 
  • Was there a favorite book or poem or song that you can share? 
  • What were the child’s favorite things? 
  • What’s your favorite memory of them? 

If you get stuck brainstorming or populating the template, you have options. You can ask family or friends to provide details or recall stories about the deceased. If you have access to photo albums, see what memories start to surface as you flip through. Don’t forget social media accounts, reviewing a person’s profile, feed, and photos can give you insights into their lives. 

Review the facts and memories you’ve written down. It’s perfectly okay to insert bits of humour into the eulogy, but avoid anything inappropriate or embarrassing. As you’re reviewing your notes, cross out anything in poor humour or that you don’t want to include. Circle or highlight what you definitely want to keep.  

Now, take those ideas and pull it all together, into a template.


Example Eulogy Templates for Printing

Example Eulogy Template for an Adult   Click here for the downloadable PDF.

OPENING 

I’d like to begin by thanking everyone for coming to celebrate ________’s (name) life.   ________ (name) was the most ________(adjective) person I’ve ever known and I know many of you would agree. He/She ________ (include a bit of information about the deceased here, perhaps a memory).

EARLY LIFE 

_________ (name) was born on ________ (birthdate) in _______ (city). He/She was the 

______ (first, second, only) child of ________ (father) and ________ (mother). His/her sisters and brothers are ________, ________, and ________ (add more or less as needed). His/her childhood was ________ (include a bit of information about the deceased here, perhaps a memory or a humorous story about the siblings).

EDUCATION AND WORK 

_________ (name) went to _______ (name of schools) and graduated with ________ (name of degree or training). He/She spent most of her career at ________ (name of company) as a _______ (name of position). He/She ________ (include a bit of information about the deceased here, perhaps a memory. What was his/her work ethic? Did he/she enjoy the work?).

MARRIAGE AND CHILDREN

In ______ (year) ________ (name) met _______ (spouse) and they were married in_____ (year). They had ___ (number) children: _______, _______, and _______ (names of children). Last year, ______ (name) and _______ (spouse) celebrated their _____ (number) wedding anniversary. He/She ________ (include additional information about the family, perhaps a funny or sweet memory).

SIGNIFICANT EVENTS AND ACHIEVEMENTS

In ______ (year), ______ (name) received the award of ______ (award). This award was meaningful to him/her because ______ (reason). He/She ________ (include additional information available, if it’s significant).

HOBBIES AND SERVICE / BELIEFS AND PASSIONS

______ (name) was active in the ________ (church, community, volunteer, etc). He/She spent many hours doing _______ (activity) and was known for ________ (descriptor). ______ (name) was passionate about ______ (passion). He/She ________ (include additional comments or memories about their extra-curricular activities).

MEMORIES

My favorite memory of ______ (name) is that time when ______ (memory). (try to tie this memory back to their character – how the deceased was as a person).

CLOSING

The world is a sadder place without ______ (name) in our lives. But ______ (name) touched each and every one of us and has left us with memories we will cherish forever. Thank you.


Eulogy Template for a Child  Click here for the downloadable PDF.

OPENING 

I’d like to begin by thanking everyone for coming to celebrate ________’s (name) life.   ________ (name) was the most ________(adjective) child I’ve ever known. He/She ________ (include a bit of information about the child here, perhaps a memory).

LIFE 

_________ (name) was born on ________ (birthdate) in _______ (city). He/She was the 

______ (first, second, only) child of ________ (father) and ________ (mother). His/her sisters and brothers are ________, ________, and ________ (add more or less as needed). His/her childhood was ________ (include a bit of information about the child here, perhaps a memory or a humorous story about the siblings).

MEMORIES AND STORIES

My favorite memory of ______ (name) is that time when ______ (memory). (Use this section to share the memories and stories about the child. Share their favorite things, their relationships with friends and family, what made them laugh.

CLOSING (an appropriate poem, perhaps the child’s favorite)

“Perhaps they are not stars,
but rather openings in heaven
where the love of our lost ones
pours through and shines down upon us
to let us know they’re happy.”
- Eskimo Proverb

The world is a sadder place without ______ (name) in our lives. But ______ (name) touched each and every one of us and has left us with memories we will cherish forever. Thank you.


Tips on Speaking the Eulogy

  • Read the eulogy out loud several times and if you trip on any words, consider editing to make it easier to read next time. 

  • Practice several times each day leading up to the event, it will prepare you for the tougher parts of the eulogy. Practice in front of the mirror. Practice in front of family or friends. Practice while standing up, as if you were at the service. Practice looking at the audience and referring to your note cards. 

  • Time yourself to ensure you are around your target: no more than 5-10 minutes. 

  • Your speech doesn’t have to be memorized, but the more you practice the less you’ll need to read and the more natural you will sound. You may feel comfortable switching to notecards with bullet points or you may prefer to keep to the script. Do what feels best.   

  • You may fear being overly emotional or breaking down. Showing your emotion is perfectly normal. Focusing on the words on the page will help you maintain your composure.

  • No matter how you choose to prepare, the most important thing is to give the best speech you can give; a speech from the heart.   

Related Pages: 

Funeral Speech Examples for Mother, Father, Friends and More

> > Free Eulogy Templates


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